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Disinfecting Aquarium Equipment


Unfortunately many people jump to the conclusion when something in the tank dies, the tank should be torn down and then start over by disinfecting aquarium equipment and tank. In many cases, the actual water quality in the aquarium is at fault and no matter how often you are disinfecting aquarium equipment, the same result will occur the next time the tank is set up new.

In a forum response to how to disinfect a system where a frog died, there are a lot of useful suggestions on what to do when you get a problem or even the build-up of carbonate deposits.  The original answer offers a bleach treatment that can be used, but with care (some spelling corrections made):

Answer by noselessman
You can safely disinfect with a one part bleach to ten parts water solution. Don not soak for more than 15 minutes. rinse like crazy in hot water afterwards, and dry for 24-48 hours. Bleach will kill the most bacteria, and it is not dangerous at al, despite what people think, the bleach will evaporate completely, vinegar doesn’t even do that, but you probably do not really need to use it, you could use non iodized salt, hot water, white vinegar, or lemon juice.

– See more at: http://aquarium-technology.aquarium-and-fish-care.com/how-do-you-disinfect-an-aquarium-decor-and-power-filter/#sthash.S0pbZ6eV.dpuf

Photo by dno1967bWhile this treatment may be effective and as safe as any, remember to carefully follow the recommendation to let the aquarium and all parts dry after disinfecting aquarium equipment.  It is true that bleach, being basically chlorine will evaporate completely, you want to be very sure that it actually has, otherwise the trauma to the fish, or in this case a frog, will be deadly.

You will find a number of formulas for disinfecting aquarium equipment in the other responses, including salt and vinegar.  Using these solutions is the safest way to clean an aquarium without using toxic chemicals that may dage any life put into the aquarium later.

Disinfecting Aquarium Equipment May Not be Required

What I do like about this post is that there are a few responses, and probably the wisest one is by sheer who comments that disinfecting aquarium equipment may not be required. This may not have been a fully matured aquarium and the water may have contained ammonia and nitrate that is not a disease, but still deadly in the aquarium.  Before tearing an aquarium down and restarting it, always try to determine that the problem actually was a disease, in many cases, it might not be, and disinfecting aquarium equipment may not be the right way to proceed.

About

Steve Pond, of Tropical Fish Aquarist, has kept fish both personally and professionally for over 50 years.  He writes regularly on the wide range of current topics that are important to people who keep tropical fish tanks as a passion and a hobby.

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About blueram

Steve Pond, of Tropical Fish Aquarist, has kept fish both personally and professionally for over 50 years.  He writes regularly on the wide range of current topics that are important to people who keep tropical fish tanks as a passion and a hobby.

View all posts by blueram →

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