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Aquarium Set-Up

Marine Set-Up


Although my main thrust with this blog is to help the freshwater aquarist, occasionally a good article on marine tropical fish also surfaces.  I have kept quite a few marine tanks, mostly fish tanks with a few forays into a reef system when the economics were particularly good for a while.  It is always a fascinating subject for aquarists of all levels, so the inclusion of a good article on marine set-up of a proper saltwater system seems to be in order.  Sam Bainbridge’s article in SwellUK.com “Marine aquarium, Set up and care “ states as its conclusion:

Taking care of your marine aquarium might seem like a lot of work, with a certain amount of money and time needing to be regularly invested. But if you find the thought of having a piece of the deep blue sea right in your living room, then you will see that the rewards of creating your own underwater kingdom are well worth the effort.

Although I must admit I do prefer the freshwater systems because they are much less complex and easier to maintain on the whole, the attraction for a marine aquarium, full of living rock, corals and reef dwelling fish still holds an intense attraction.  I think we all dream of the beauty of the undersea coral reefs and the jewels they hold.

A Marine Set-Up is possible for many sizes

I grew up learning that the minimum marine set-up aquarium to house any saltwater specimens should be at least 30 gallons.  The dream of a small desktop aquarium with a full reef growing inside is pretty much a pipe dream for most of us, although it is done regularly by professionals who have the time to care for it.  You will hear arguments that this large a tank is not necessary, and reefs can be set up in much less.  There are aquarists who have been successful for long periods of time,  but for most of us, that is the simple fact – stay above 30 gallons if you want to keep your fish alive.

The bigger the aquarium, the better chance you have of keeping the life inside alive and thriving.  The larger the water capacity, the more forgiveness the tank will offer should something go wrong – and it usually does.   This article provides some nice marine set-up pictures of a Red Sea Max 130D (34 U.S. Gallons) being prepared and final shots.  At least the tank selected was large enough to give SwellUK.com a good shot at long-term success.  Best of luck, Mark and SwellUK.


About

Steve Pond, of Tropical Fish Aquarist, has kept fish both personally and professionally for over 50 years.  He writes regularly on the wide range of current topics that are important to people who keep tropical fish tanks as a passion and a hobby.

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About blueram

Steve Pond, of Tropical Fish Aquarist, has kept fish both personally and professionally for over 50 years.  He writes regularly on the wide range of current topics that are important to people who keep tropical fish tanks as a passion and a hobby.

View all posts by blueram →

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